Aiyeee…. April 15th and all that. For our off-shore readers, that is when the US Gov’t’s IRS comes to collect their pound of flesh. Not a pretty time…no not at all. It isn’t like you can tell where the money goes, until you pick up the Wall Street Journal, and see all the Corporations producing armaments are going great balls of fire… with our tax money. It has been estimated that the ultimate cost of this war will cost 3 Trillion Dollars, and much of this amount is going to corporations, and the individuals who invested in them as payments, dividends and the like. Sad indeed.
I wouldn’t mind paying taxes, when I know that it goes to something worthwhile, like healthcare, education, research to help get us out of the mess we are in… One can hope that this election cycle will see something better this way come.
Maybe this really points to the real solution(s): small and local, inter connected morphic communities as opposed to the massive state (which is breaking down for a reason, and probably it is a good one at that.) As a structure becomes more intricate it becomes increasingly more fragile. We are in perhaps the last days of the mega state…
So here is to all you local heroines and heroes waging love and harmony in your communities where ever you may be. You, your beloved, your children, friends, and neighbors are the real wealth. Through you, it all changes. Be Brave!
This edition has some nice bits in it… so hopefully you will enjoy it!..
Don’t forget to tune in to Radio Free EarthRites today… lots going on, excellent music, and please try out our Spoken Word Channel as well!
Bright Blessings!
Gwyllm
(Gwyllm n Tomas, a summer or 2 ago…!)

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On The Menu:

Son Kite: On Air

The Links

The Fairy Folk of Tara

In The Dreaming: Charles Baudelaire

Art: Jesse King & Gwyllm

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Son Kite: On Air

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The Links:

Space Debris Evolution In Pictures

The seriously inconvenient truth on drugs…

Da Vinci’s Mother?

Horribly Wrong Web Design….

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The Fairy Folk of Tara

[Note: This is taken from W.Y. Evans Wentz’s The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries.]
On the ancient Hill of Tara, from whose heights the High Kings once ruled all Ireland, from where the sacred fires in pagan days announced the annual resurrection of the sun, the Easter Tide, where the magic of Patrick prevailed over the magic of the Druids, and where the hosts of the Tuatha De Danann were wont to appear at the great Feast of Samain, to-day the fairy-folk of modern times hold undisputed sovereignty. And from no point better than Tara, which thus was once the magical and political centre of the Sacred Island, could we begin our study of the Irish Fairy-Faith. Though the Hill has lain unploughed and deserted since the curses of Christian priests fell upon it, on the calm air of summer evenings, at the twilight hour, wondrous music still sounds over its slopes, and at night long, weird processions of silent spirits march round its grass-grown raths and forts. It is only men who fear the curse of the Christians; the fairy-folk regard it not.
The Rev. Father Peter Kenney, of Kilmessan, had directed me to John Graham, an old man over seventy years of age, who has lived near Tara most of his life; and after I bad found John, and he had led me from rath to rath and then right through the length of the site where once stood the banquet hail of kings and heroes and Druids, as he earnestly described the past glories of Tara to which these ancient monuments bear silent testimony, we sat down in the thick sweet grass on the Sacred Hill and began talking of the olden times in Ireland, and then of the good people’ : –
The ‘Good People’s’ Music.-‘ As sure as you are sitting down I beard the pipes there in that wood (pointing to a wood on the north-west slope of the Hill, and west of the banquet hall). I heard the music another time on a hot summer evening at the Rath of Ringlestown, in a field where all the grass had been burned off; and I often heard it in the wood of Tara. Whenever the good people play, you hear their music all through the field as plain as can be; and it is the grandest kind of music. It may last half the night, but once day comes, it ends.’

Who the ‘ Good People’ are. – I now asked John what sort of a race the ‘good people’ are, and where they came from, and this is his reply :-‘ People killed and murdered in war stay on earth till their time is up, and they are among the good people. The souls on this earth are as thick as the grass (running his walking-stick through a thick clump), and you can’t see them; and evil spirits are just as thick, too, and people don’t know it. Because there are so many spirits knocking (going) about they must appear to some people. The old folk saw the good people here on the Hill a hundred times, and they’d always be talking about them. The good people can see everything, and you dare not meddle with them. They live in raths, and their houses are in them. The opinion always was that they are a race of spirits, for they can go into different forms, and can appear big as well as little.’

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In The Dreaming: Charles Baudelaire

I Love The Naked Ages Long Ago

I love the naked ages long ago

When statues were gilded by Apollo,

When men and women of agility

Could play without lies and anxiety,

And the sky lovingly caressed their spines,

As it exercised its noble machine.

Fertile Cybele, mother of nature, then,

Would not place on her daughters a burden,

But, she-wolf sharing her heart with the people,

Would feed creation from her brown nipples.

Men, elegant and strong, would have the right

To be proud to have beauty named their king;

Virgin fruit free of blemish and cracking,

Whose flesh smooth and firm would summon a bite!

The Poet today, when he would convey

This native grandeur, would not be swept away

By man free and woman natural,

But would feel darkness envelop his soul

Before this black tableau full of loathing.

O malformed monsters crying for clothing!

O ludicrous heads! Torsos needing disguise!

O poor writhing bodies of every wrong size,

Children that the god of the Useful swaths

In the language of bronze and brass!

And women, alas! You shadow your heredity,

You gnaw nourishment from debauchery,

A virgin holds maternal lechery

And all the horrors of fecundity!
We have, it is true, corrupt nations,

Beauty unknown to the radiant ancients:

Faces that gnaw through the heart’s cankers,

And talk with the cool beauty of languor;

But these inventions of our backward muses

Are never hindered in their morbid uses

Of the old for profound homage to youth,

—To the young saint, the sweet air, the simple truth,

To the eye as limpid as the water current,

To spread out over all, insouciant

Like the blue sky, the birds and the flowers,

Its perfumes, its songs and its sweet fervors.
-Translated by William A. Sigler
(A French Post-Card from so long ago…)

—-

L’Invitation au Voyage

Mon enfant, ma soeur,

Songe à la douceur,

D’aller là-bas, vivre ensemble!

Aimer à loisir,

Aimer et mourir,

Au pays qui te ressemble!

Les soleils mouillés,

De ces ciels brouillés,

Pour mon esprit ont les charmes,

Si mystérieux,

De tes traîtres yeux,

Brillant à travers leurs larmes.
—-

Her Hair

O fleece, that down the neck waves to the nape!

O curls! O perfume nonchalant and rare!

O ecstasy! To fill this alcove shape

With memories that in these tresses sleep,

I would shake them like penions in the air!
Languorous Asia, burning Africa,

And a far world, defunct almost, absent,

Within your aromatic forest stay!

As other souls on music drift away,

Mine, O my love! still floats upon your scent.
I shall go there where, full of sap, both tree

And man swoon in the heat of the southern climates;

Strong tresses be the swell that carries me!

I dream upon your sea of amber

Of dazzling sails, of oarsmen, masts, and flames:
A sun-drenched and reverberating port,

Where I imbibe colour and sound and scent;

Where vessels, gliding through the gold and moiré,

Open their vast arms as they leave the shore

To clasp the pure and shimmering firmament.
I’ll plunge my head, enamored of its pleasure,

In this black ocean where the other hides;

My subtle spirit then will know a measure

Of fertile idleness and fragrant leisure,

Lulled by the infinite rhythm of its tides!
Pavilion, of autumn-shadowed tresses spun,

You give me back the azure from afar;

And where the twisted locks are fringed with down

Lurk mingled odors I grow drunk upon

Of oil of coconut, of musk, and tar.
A long time! always! my hand in your hair

Will sow the stars of sapphire, pearl, ruby,

That you be never deaf to my desire,

My oasis and my gourd whence I aspire

To drink deep of the wine of memory.
—-

De Profundis Clamavi

Have pity, You alone whom I adore

From down this black pit where my heart is sped,

A sombre universe ringed round with lead

Where fear and curses the long night explore.
Six months a cold sun hovers overhead;

The other six is night upon this land.

No beast; no stream; no wood; no leaves expand.

The desert Pole is not a waste so dead.
Now in the whole world there’s no horror quite

so cold and cruel as this glacial sun,

So like old Chaos as this boundless night;
I envy the least animals that run,

Which can find respite in brute slumber drowned,

So slowly is the skein of time unwound.
—-

Cats

They are alike, prim scholar and per fervid lover:

When comes the season of decay, they both decide

Upon sweet, husky cats to be the household pride;

Cats choose, like them, to sit, and like them, shudder.
Like partisans of carnal dalliance and science,

They search for silence and the shadowings of dread;

Hell well might harness them as horses for the dead,

If it could bend their native proudness in compliance.
In reverie they emulate the noble mood

Of giant sphinxes stretched in depths of solitude

Who seem to slumber in a never-ending dream;
Within their fertile loins a sparkling magic lies;

Finer than any sand are dusts of gold that gleam,

Vague starpoints, in the mystic iris of their eyes.